B.A. in Africana Studies

The Africana Studies program provides the opportunity for students to study, analyze and systematically evaluate the various disciplines from an Africana perspective.

The program continues to attract students from all ethnic, racial, and cultural backgrounds as they recognize ways that Africana Studies provides them with a forum to examine the intellectual life, the historical experience, and the cultural understanding of one of this country’s largest racial minority groups.


About the Program

Students electing to pursue courses in the Africana Studies program are entering into the current intellectual dialogue on multiculturalism in this society as they study with professors who have conducted notable research in African, Caribbean, Africana, and African-American Studies.

The Africana Studies program at Stockton University is affiliated with the National Council for Black Studies, Inc. (NCBS) and students are eligible to apply for membership in Ankh Maat Wedjau, the National Honor Society for majors and minors in Africana Studies. Majors and minors in Africana Studies at Stockton University will also come to appreciate their responsibility to their communities through various projects, including, but not limited to: assisting in building and preserving exhibits at the African American Museum in Atlantic City ; involvement in research and service projects that impact the homeless, youth and seniors in the surrounding communities ; and programs assisting those in need who are abroad. Students will also gain opportunities to intern for various nonprofit and for-profit organizations and government agencies.

Comcast Newsmakers Features Africana Studies

Program Coordinator

Donnetrice C. Allison

Dr. Donnetrice C. Allison
Professor of Communication Studies and Africana Studies
Donnetrice.Allison@stockton.edu
609-652-4721 | C-118

 

Curriculum

 

Program Organization

Students may major or minor in Africana Studies by completing the required core and cognate courses, meeting the grade-point-average criterion and submitting a portfolio with samples of their written course work. The Africana Studies program at Stockton University is affiliated with the National Council for Black Studies, Inc. (NCBS) and students are eligible to apply for membership in Ankh Maat Wedjau, the National Honor Society for majors and minors in Africana Studies.

A diverse selection of Africana Studies (AFRI) program courses and General Studies courses are available for completion of either the major or minor. Courses are divided into core and cognate categories. Core courses are further divided into the following concentrations: history/humanities, arts and entertainment, social and political perspectives, global perspectives, and literature. Both core and cognate courses are offered each academic year. Independent study projects with interested faculty members are also available. In addition, opportunities for study in selected African countries are possible, as are faculty-led study tours to West Africa, South Africa and historic sites across the U.S. Students interested in these travel opportunities should contact the coordinators of Africana Studies and Study Abroad for further details. The Africana Studies program is open to everyone regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, or ethnic background.

 

Major Concentrations & Minor Curriculum 

Program Courses: 64 Credits

Core Courses (4 credits each):

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 1092 (First Year Seminar in Africana
    Studies
  • AFRI 2101 Ancient African Civilizations
  • AFRI 2103 The African World: Contemporary Issues and Social Concerns
  • AFRI 3122 An Afrocentric Approach to American History
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar
  • Experiential Learning Requirement – Choose One
    • AFRI 3125 West Africa Now Study Tour
    • AFRI 3132 African Americans in New Jersey
    • AFRI 3143 African American Civil Rights in the US Study Tour
    • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society
    • GSS 2451 South Africa Now Study Tour
    • SOCY 2355 Black Lives: Social and Economic Realities

24 credits


Core Courses (4 credits each):

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 1092 (First Year Seminar in Africana
    Studies
  • AFRI 2101 Ancient African Civilizations
  • AFRI 2103 The African World: Contemporary Issues and Social Concerns
  • AFRI 3122 An Afrocentric Approach to American History
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar
  • Experiential Learning Requirement – Choose One
    • AFRI 3125 West Africa Now Study Tour
    • AFRI 3132 African Americans in New Jersey
    • AFRI 3143 African American Civil Rights in the US Study Tour
    • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society
    • GSS 2451 South Africa Now Study Tour
    • SOCY 2355 Black Lives: Social and Economic Realities

24 credits


Core Courses (4 credits each):

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 1092 (First Year Seminar in Africana
    Studies
  • AFRI 2101 Ancient African Civilizations
  • AFRI 2103 The African World: Contemporary Issues and Social Concerns
  • AFRI 3122 An Afrocentric Approach to American History
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar
  • Experiential Learning Requirement – Choose One
    • AFRI 3125 West Africa Now Study Tour
    • AFRI 3132 African Americans in New Jersey
    • AFRI 3143 African American Civil Rights in the US Study Tour
    • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society
    • GSS 2451 South Africa Now Study Tour
    • SOCY 2355 Black Lives: Social and Economic Realities

24 credits


History/Humanities Concentration Courses — Choose 4:

  • AFRI 2112 The History of Black Education
  • AFRI 2122 A History of Black Protest and Civil Unrest
  • AFRI 3110 African Languages 
  • AFRI 3142 African and African American Religious Practice 
  • GAH 2360 The Civil Rights Movement: 1950’s-1980’s
  • HIST 2119 History of Ancient Egypt
  • HIST 2128 Atlantic History
  • HIST 2171 The Black Atlantic
  • HIST 2330 African-American Civilization to 1865
  • HIST 2331 African-American Civilization since 1865
  • HIST 2410 Reading Egyptian Hieroglyphics
  • HIST 3105 Civil War and Reconstruction 
  • HIST 3605 Slavery and Emancipation 
  • PHIL 2201 African-American Philosophy

16 Credits 


Cognate Courses — Choose 6

  • ANTH 2245 Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
  • GSS 2264 Race & Islam in the US
  • GAH 3207 Blaxploitation: Cinema During the 1970s
  • GIS 4656 Documenting Hemmings and Jefferson
  • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business and Society
  • GAH 1360 Topics in African-American History and Culture
  • GSS 2195 Blacks and Jews: Future Hope
  • GSS 3162 Africana Male/Female Relationships
  • CRIM 3715 Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
  • COMM 3306 Women, Minorities, and the Media
  • GAH 3206 Race and U.S. Culture
  • GSS 2278 Dealing with Diversity
  • GSS 2480 The Sixties
  • MUSC 1143 Vocal Jazz Ensemble
  • POLS 2245 Race and Politics
  • SOWK 2504 Race, Ethnicity, Diversity
  • SOCY 3636 W.E.B. Du Bois: The Scholar and Activist
  • GAH 3229 Race and Gender in African American Art
  • GIS 4462 African American Women and Health Equity

24 Credits


General Studies Courses: 32 Credits

25% of all the courses a student takes at Stockton must be in General Studies Courses. This is called "The 25% Rule." This rule applies to transfer students as well as first-year students.

For first-year students and transfer students with less than 64 credits, the 32 credits for General Studies must be taken in the following array: 

  • General Arts & Humanities courses (GAH): 8 credits
  • General Interdisciplinary Skills & Topics course(s) (GEN): 4 credits 
  • General Integration & Synthesis course (GIS): 4 credits
  • General Natural Sciences & Mathematics courses (GNM): 8 credits
  • General Social & Bevahioral Sciences courses (GSS): 8 credits

If you have transfer credits, some of these may be allocated as General Studies courses:

  • 1-15 transfer credits: no General Studies equivalencies awarded
  • 16-31 transfer credits : up to 1 General Studies equivalency awarded
  • 32-47 transfer credits: up to 2 General Studies equivalencies awarded
  • 48-59 transfer credits: up to 3 General Studies equivalencies awarded.
  • 60 or more transfer credits: no equivalencies granted.

For all freshmen and transfer students: Your Degree Works online degree evaluation will calculate which general studies will have to be completed at Stockton.

The General Studies requirement is shrunk to 16 credits. One GIS course must be completed as a part of those 16 credits; the other credits can be completed in any General Studies category. The At-Some-Distance credits then grows to 48 credits for the B.A. degree, and 32 credits for the B.S. degree. This is very helpful to the transfer student who may have many excess elective credits.

Writing Requirement

In order to graduate, all students must complete:

  • At least four (4) W1 or W2 courses with grades of C or better, including
  • a W1 course taken during the freshman year, and
  • at least one W1 or W2 course numbered 3000 or higher.

Both W1 and W2 courses are counted as part of a student's Program, Cognate, General Studies, or At-Some Distance courses; therefore, they do not necessarily require any credits beyond the 128 minimum to graduate.

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement

In order to graduate, all students must complete:

  • At least three (3) Q1 or Q2 courses, including
  • at least one Q1 course (one must be taken during the freshman year), and
  • at least one Q2 course

Both Q1 and Q2 courses are counted as part of a student's Program, Cognate, General Studies, or At-Some Distance courses; therefore, they do not necessarily require any credits beyond the 128 minimum to graduate.

Race and Racism Education Requirement

In order to graduate, all students matriculating in Fall 2021 or later must  complete:

  • One Race and/or Racism Education intensive course (R1)
  • One Race and/or Racism Education intensive course (R1) or one Race and/or Racism-Across-the-Curriculum (R2) course

Students are required to earn a C or better for courses designated as R1: Race and Racism Intensive courses and a D or better in courses designated as R2: Race and Racism Education-Across-the-Curriculum. Up to one transfer course in Race and Racism Education can be credited as an R1 or R2 course and counted
toward the requirement. The second course must be completed at Stockton.

R1 and R2 courses may simultaneously fulfill the Race and Racism Education Requirement and other graduation and program requirements

General Education Outcome Requirement

All students must take and pass one course in each of four areas: Arts (A), Historical Consciousness (H), Values/Ethics (V), and International/Multicultural (I).

These courses, while required, do not add any credits to the minimum of 128 to graduate. Students may take Stockton courses that have been designated by A, H, V, and I and apply them to program, cognate, General Studies, and "At Some Distance" as appropriate.

At-Some-Distance Courses: 32 Credits

At-Some Distance Courses are courses that are in some way unrelated to the students' major program. For first-year students and transfers with less than 64 credits, the At-Some-Distance electives constitute one-quarter of the degree for a Bachelor of Arts.

For students with 64 transfer credits, the At-Some-Distance electives increase by 16 credits, and the General Studies category shrinks by 16 credits. This makes the Stockton curriculum very receptive for transfer credits. 

Program Courses: 64 Credits 

Core Courses (4 credits each):

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 1092 (First Year Seminar in Africana
    Studies
  • AFRI 2101 Ancient African Civilizations
  • AFRI 2103 The African World: Contemporary Issues and Social Concerns
  • AFRI 3122 An Afrocentric Approach to American History
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar
  • Experiential Learning Requirement – Choose One
    • AFRI 3125 West Africa Now Study Tour
    • AFRI 3132 African Americans in New Jersey
    • AFRI 3143 African American Civil Rights in the US Study Tour
    • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society
    • GSS 2451 South Africa Now Study Tour
    • SOCY 2355 Black Lives: Social and Economic Realities

24 credits


Arts/Entertainment & Literature Concentration Courses — Choose 4:

  • Music
    • AFRI 2115 The Evolution of Contemporary Black Experience in Music 
    • AFRI 1248 Music of Black Americans
    • AFRI 2184 An Introduction to Hip Hop Culture
    • GAH 2310 Reggae: Music and Culture
  • Performance
    • GAH 1216 African-American Theater Workshop I
    • AFRI 2602 African-American Theater Workshop II
    • GAH 1215 African-American Dance
    • AFRI 2701 African-American Dance: The Contemporary Era 
    • AFRI 2202 Black Performance from the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Arts Movement
  • Media
    • AFRI 2118 Blacks in Comics and Video Games 
    • AFRI 2123 Black Entertainment: From Chitlin’ Circuit to Super Stardom
    • AFRI 3135 African Americans and the Shaping of Pop Culture 
    • COMM 2414 Blacks on Television
    • AFRI 3295 African-American Movies
    • AFRI 3148 Black Comedy: What Lies Beneath the Surface
  • Literature
    • AFRI 3118 African and Diasporic African Folklore
    • AFRI 3112 Literature of the African Diaspora
    • AFRI 3115 African Literature
    • LITT 2148 Intro to African American Literature
    • GAH 1750 African American Literature and Culture
    • GIS 3672 Narratives of the Enslaved
    • GAH 3121 African-American Women Writers
    • LITT 3122 The Contemporary African-American Novel
    • LITT 3309 The Literature of the Harlem Renaissance
    • LITT 3317 Race and the Making of U.S. Literature

16 Credits 


Cognate Courses — Choose 6

  • ANTH 2245 Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
  • GSS 2264 Race & Islam in the US
  • GAH 3207 Blaxploitation: Cinema During the 1970s
  • GIS 4656 Documenting Hemmings and Jefferson
  • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business and Society
  • GAH 1360 Topics in African-American History and Culture
  • GSS 2195 Blacks and Jews: Future Hope
  • GSS 3162 Africana Male/Female Relationships
  • CRIM 3715 Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
  • COMM 3306 Women, Minorities, and the Media
  • GAH 3206 Race and U.S. Culture
  • GSS 2278 Dealing with Diversity
  • GSS 2480 The Sixties
  • MUSC 1143 Vocal Jazz Ensemble
  • POLS 2245 Race and Politics
  • SOWK 2504 Race, Ethnicity, Diversity
  • SOCY 3636 W.E.B. Du Bois: The Scholar and Activist
  • GAH 3229 Race and Gender in African American Art
  • GIS 4462 African American Women and Health Equity

24 Credits


General Studies Courses: 32 Credits

25% of all the courses a student takes at Stockton must be in General Studies Courses. This is called "The 25% Rule." This rule applies to transfer students as well as first-year students.

For first-year students and transfer students with less than 64 credits, the 32 credits for General Studies must be taken in the following array: 

  • General Arts & Humanities courses (GAH): 8 credits
  • General Interdisciplinary Skills & Topics course(s) (GEN): 4 credits 
  • General Integration & Synthesis course (GIS): 4 credits
  • General Natural Sciences & Mathematics courses (GNM): 8 credits
  • General Social & Bevahioral Sciences courses (GSS): 8 credits

If you have transfer credits, some of these may be allocated as General Studies courses:

  • 1-15 transfer credits: no General Studies equivalencies awarded
  • 16-31 transfer credits : up to 1 General Studies equivalency awarded
  • 32-47 transfer credits: up to 2 General Studies equivalencies awarded
  • 48-59 transfer credits: up to 3 General Studies equivalencies awarded.
  • 60 or more transfer credits: no equivalencies granted.

For all freshmen and transfer students: Your Degree Works online degree evaluation will calculate which general studies will have to be completed at Stockton.

The General Studies requirement is shrunk to 16 credits. One GIS course must be completed as a part of those 16 credits; the other credits can be completed in any General Studies category. The At-Some-Distance credits then grows to 48 credits for the B.A. degree, and 32 credits for the B.S. degree. This is very helpful to the transfer student who may have many excess elective credits.

Writing Requirement

In order to graduate, all students must complete:

  • At least four (4) W1 or W2 courses with grades of C or better, including
  • a W1 course taken during the freshman year, and
  • at least one W1 or W2 course numbered 3000 or higher.

Both W1 and W2 courses are counted as part of a student's Program, Cognate, General Studies, or At-Some Distance courses; therefore, they do not necessarily require any credits beyond the 128 minimum to graduate.

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement

In order to graduate, all students must complete:

  • At least three (3) Q1 or Q2 courses, including
  • at least one Q1 course (one must be taken during the freshman year), and
  • at least one Q2 course

Both Q1 and Q2 courses are counted as part of a student's Program, Cognate, General Studies, or At-Some Distance courses; therefore, they do not necessarily require any credits beyond the 128 minimum to graduate.

Race and Racism Education Requirement

In order to graduate, all students matriculating in Fall 2021 or later must  complete:

  • One Race and/or Racism Education intensive course (R1)
  • One Race and/or Racism Education intensive course (R1) or one Race and/or Racism-Across-the-Curriculum (R2) course

Students are required to earn a C or better for courses designated as R1: Race and Racism Intensive courses and a D or better in courses designated as R2: Race and Racism Education-Across-the-Curriculum. Up to one transfer course in Race and Racism Education can be credited as an R1 or R2 course and counted
toward the requirement. The second course must be completed at Stockton.

R1 and R2 courses may simultaneously fulfill the Race and Racism Education Requirement and other graduation and program requirements

General Education Outcome Requirement

All students must take and pass one course in each of four areas: Arts (A), Historical Consciousness (H), Values/Ethics (V), and International/Multicultural (I).

These courses, while required, do not add any credits to the minimum of 128 to graduate. Students may take Stockton courses that have been designated by A, H, V, and I and apply them to program, cognate, General Studies, and "At Some Distance" as appropriate.

At-Some-Distance Courses: 32 Credits

At-Some Distance Courses are courses that are in some way unrelated to the students' major program. For first-year students and transfers with less than 64 credits, the At-Some-Distance electives constitute one-quarter of the degree for a Bachelor of Arts.

For students with 64 transfer credits, the At-Some-Distance electives increase by 16 credits, and the General Studies category shrinks by 16 credits. This makes the Stockton curriculum very receptive for transfer credits. 

Program Courses: 64 Credits

Core Courses (4 credits each):

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 1092 (First Year Seminar in Africana
    Studies
  • AFRI 2101 Ancient African Civilizations
  • AFRI 2103 The African World: Contemporary Issues and Social Concerns
  • AFRI 3122 An Afrocentric Approach to American History
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar
  • Experiential Learning Requirement – Choose One
    • AFRI 3125 West Africa Now Study Tour
    • AFRI 3132 African Americans in New Jersey
    • AFRI 3143 African American Civil Rights in the US Study Tour
    • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society
    • GSS 2451 South Africa Now Study Tour
    • SOCY 2355 Black Lives: Social and Economic Realities

24 credits


Social/Political & Global Perspectives Concentration Courses — Choose 4:

  • AFRI 2105 African-Caribbean: Ethnic, Racial and Cultural Diversity
  • AFRI 2108 West African History and Culture
  • AFRI 2110 Pan Africanism & Diasporic Political Movements, Organizations, Social
    Groups & Initiatives
  • HIST 2119 History of Ancient Egypt
  • AFRI 2120 And Some of Us are Brave: Black Women in the Shaping of America
  • GSS 2188 African-Americans and the Law
  • GAH 2350 Black Men in America
  • AFRI 3112 Literature of the African Diaspora 
  • AFRI 3115 African Literature
  • AFRI 3118 African and Diasporic African Folklore 
  • AFRI 3145 The Contemporary African American Family: Social Issues and Concerns
  • AFRI 3150 The Social and Economic Realities of Black Life in America 
  • AFRI 3162 African American Leadership and Community Development 
  • AFRI 3165 Social & Psychological Perspectives on the Black Experience
  • AFRI 3170 Urban Black Politics
  • AFRI 3190 Black Power
  • AFRI 3152 The African Contribution to History and World Development 
  • AFRI 3168 Race and Identity in the African Diaspora
  • AFRI 3602 Black Feminism 
  • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business in a Global Society

16 Credits


Cognate Courses — Choose 6

  • ANTH 2245 Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
  • GSS 2264 Race & Islam in the US
  • GAH 3207 Blaxploitation: Cinema During the 1970s
  • GIS 4656 Documenting Hemmings and Jefferson
  • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business and Society
  • GAH 1360 Topics in African-American History and Culture
  • GSS 2195 Blacks and Jews: Future Hope
  • GSS 3162 Africana Male/Female Relationships
  • CRIM 3715 Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
  • COMM 3306 Women, Minorities, and the Media
  • GAH 3206 Race and U.S. Culture
  • GSS 2278 Dealing with Diversity
  • GSS 2480 The Sixties
  • MUSC 1143 Vocal Jazz Ensemble
  • POLS 2245 Race and Politics
  • SOWK 2504 Race, Ethnicity, Diversity
  • SOCY 3636 W.E.B. Du Bois: The Scholar and Activist
  • GAH 3229 Race and Gender in African American Art
  • GIS 4462 African American Women and Health Equity

24 Credits

Each student will be required to take a minimum of five courses (20 credits) to complete the minor:

Core Courses 

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies, GSS 2201 Africana Studies: An Introductory Perspective or GSS 1092
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar

8 credits


Concentration Courses
Choose two courses from the History/Humanities, Arts/Entertainment & Literature, or Social/Political & Global Perspectives Concentration

8 credits


Cognate Course — Choose one of the following:

  • ANTH 2245 Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
  • GSS 2264 Race & Islam in the US
  • GAH 3207 Blaxploitation: Cinema During the 1970s
  • GIS 4656 Documenting Hemmings and Jefferson
  • GIS 4671 Contemporary African Business and Society
  • GAH 1360 Topics in African-American History and Culture
  • GSS 2195 Blacks and Jews: Future Hope
  • GSS 3162 Africana Male/Female Relationships
  • CRIM 3715 Race, Class and Gender in Criminal Justice
  • COMM 3306 Women, Minorities, and the Media
  • GAH 3206 Race and U.S. Culture
  • GSS 2278 Dealing with Diversity
  • GSS 2480 The Sixties
  • MUSC 1143 Vocal Jazz Ensemble
  • POLS 2245 Race and Politics
  • SOWK 2504 Race, Ethnicity, Diversity
  • SOCY 3636 W.E.B. Du Bois: The Scholar and Activist
  • GAH 3229 Race and Gender in African American Art
  • GIS 4462 African American Women and Health Equity

4 credits


Core Courses:

  • AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies, GSS 2201 Africana Studies: An Introductory Perspective or GSS 1092
  • AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar

8 credits

 

To view the curriculum, you’ll use the web program, Degree Works. This program is accessible even if you are not currently a student with Stockton University.

Current Students

Access your portal for Degree Works, then look for the “what if” option to explore the various paths towards degree completion. Click the button below for instructional viodes on how to use Degree Works

 

Prospective First Year or Transfer Students

Use the button below: 

 

How to Use Degree Works Equivalency

  • At the next page you are prompted with three (3) options. Select the one that says “continue without signing in.”
  • Respond to each prompt using the pull-down menu in the center of the page. [Please be patient. It may take a few seconds for the system to process your request. If you see a NO symbol, you need to wait a moment!]

Prompts include:

  • Enrollment dates (Choose intended semester attending)
  • Intended level (Choose “undergraduate”)
  • What degree you will pursue? (Choose “Bachelor of Arts”)
  • What is your intended major? (Choose “Africana Studies”)
  • What is your intended concentration? (Choose “History/Humanities,” "Arts, Entertainment, and Literature," or "Social/Political and Global Perspectives")
  • What is your intended minor? (Choose “none or select one - it is not required). For Africana Studies minors, select "Africana Studies."
  • For prospective students, choose “I’m all done" button.
  • For transfer students, use the “class” button to see how courses already taken fit into the Stockton degree path.
  • You will see an overview of the degree you have selected, including all requirements.
  • At the bottom of the screen, you could save or print the worksheet.

Minor

Each student will be required to take a minimum of five courses to complete the minor. Two of these must be the introductory course (AFRI 1101 Introduction to Africana Studies or GSS 2201 Africana Studies: An Introductory Perspective) and the seminar (AFRI 4601 Senior Seminar or GIS 4601 African-Americans: A Seminar). The introductory course is the required prerequisite for the seminar. Two additional courses may be selected from one of the above concentrations, and the final course may be selected from the cognate group. Students selecting an independent study as a substitute should discuss this with the program coordinator prior to registration. For program assessment purposes, graduating seniors are required to submit a portfolio with three (3) samples of their written work from core courses in Africana Studies.Students who earn a minimum 2.0 grade point average in their required courses qualify for the minor. Students who earn a 3.5 or greater average in core courses qualify for Ankh Maat Wedjau, the National Honor Society for Africana Studies majors and minors for NCBS. Core and cognate courses are listed below. Interested students should contact the Africana Studies coordinator each term for updates.

Faculty

Donnetrice C. Allison

Donnetrice C. Allison, Director of Strategic Initiatives and Professor of Communication Studies and Africana Studies

609-652-4721 | C-118
 Patricia Reid-Merritt

 Patricia Reid-Merritt,  Distinguished Professor of Africana Studies and Social Work, DSW

609-652-4609  |  K-117
Kimoni Yaw Ajani (formerly Wilbert St.Hilaire)

Kimoni Yaw Ajani (formerly Wilbert St.Hilaire), Assistant Professor of Africana Studies

K-133

Adjunct Faculty

Toyo Aboderin

Toyo Aboderin,   Africana Studies Adjunct Faculty

Adisa Alkebulan

Adisa Alkebulan,   Africana Studies Adjunct Faculty

Ricky Epps-Kearney

Ricky Epps-Kearney,   Africana Studies Adjunct Faculty

Richlyn Goddard

Richlyn Goddard,   Africana Studies Adjunct Faculty

Louise Gorham-Neblett

Louise Gorham-Neblett, Africana Studies Adjunct Faculty

Affiliated Faculty

Robert James Barney

Robert James Barney, Associate Professor of Social Work

Darrell Cleveland

Darrell Cleveland, Associate Professor of Education and Africana Studies

Faculty Research

Africana Studies Statement

"We are, indeed, experiencing a unique moment in American history.  In the summer of 2020, the Nation witnessed an outpouring of emotions as tens of thousands took to the streets in virtually every state of the Union to protest the persistence of racism in America.  Led by the Black Lives Matter Movement and galvanized by the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police, protesters, both Black and White, young and old, took it upon themselves to engage in public demonstrations amid calls for social justice.  For many, witnessing the slow and brutal death of George Floyd, in an eight minute, forty-six second video clip captured by 17-year-old Darnella Frazier on her cellphone, was the tipping point that moved them to action.   But it wasn’t just about George Floyd.  The names of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbury, Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner and so many others served as a chorus to cacophonous chants of “No Justice, No Peace!”  In the midst of the global and national Covid-19 pandemic, which forced millions to shelter at home for months, the American people were signaling that they had had enough.” Dr. Pat Reid-Merritt, Distinguished Professor of Africana Studies and Social Work. We here in the Africana Studies Program vow to help you navigate these issues, understand the history behind racial injustice, and help you find your own voice to add the chorus demanding change. When do we want it – NOW!

Career Opportunities

What can a student do with a degree in Africana Studies…. Anything!
Professional opportunities range from medicine, to the sciences, to criminal justice, to politics, to education and entertainment. A professional can take their knowledge and understanding of people of African descent into any professional field to educate others and increase sensitivity.

  • Angela Bassett, Actress – BA in African American Studies, Yale University
  • Rhea Boyd, Pediatrician – BA in Africana Studies, University of Notre Dame
  • Ava DuVernay, Director – BA in English literature and African-American studies, UCLA
  • Jendayi Frazer, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs – BA in Political Science and African-American Studies, Stanford University
  • Mae Jemison, Engineer, Astronaut – BA in African and Afro-American Studies, Stanford University
  • Aaron McGruder, Cartoonist The Boondocks – BA in African American Studies, University of Maryland
  • Gloria Naylor, Novelist – MA in African American Studies, Yale University
  • Michelle Obama, Former FLOTUS – BA in Sociology and minor in African-American studies, Princeton University
  • Issa Rae, Actress & Writer – BA in African and African-American Studies, Stanford University
  • Richard W. Roberts, Judge – BA, Vassar College
  • Amanda Seales, Actress Comedian – MA in African American Studies, Columbia University
  • Claudia L. Thomas, first female African-American orthopedic surgeon in the US – BA in Black Studies, Vassar College
  • Jose Antonio Vargas, Journalist – BA in political science and Black Studies, San Francisco State University
  • Darrell Cleveland, Associate Professor of Education – BA in African American Studies, Temple University
  • Richlyn Goddard, adjunct for Stockton University Africana Studies Program – certificate in Africana Studies at Stockton University and MA in African American Studies from Temple University.
  • John Gray, Assistant Dean of Education – certificate in Africana Studies, Stockton University
  • Carra Hood, Associate Provost & Associate Professor of Writing – BA in Africana Studies/Puerto Rican/Latino Studies from Hunter College/CUNY and an MA in African Studies from Yale University.
  • Christina Jackson, Assistant Professor of Sociology – postdoctoral fellowship in Africana Studies, Gettysburg College
  • Jonathan L. Johnson, Ph.D., Director, Community Wellness & Health Education – Graduate certificate in Pan-African Studies at the University of Louisville
  • Ariane Newman, Assistant Dean School of Health Sciences – certificate in Africana Studies, Stockton University
  • Tiffany Rice, Complex Director Atlantic City Residential Hall – BA in Africana World Studies and Sociology, William Patterson University

Click here for a comprehensive list of Africana Studies majors and possible career paths.

Additional Information

Special Opportunities

One of the most important components of Black Studies Programs, which first emerged at colleges and universities across the country in the late 1960s, is service to the community. Majors and minors in Africana Studies at Stockton University will also come to appreciate their responsibility to their communities through various projects, including, but not limited to: assisting in building and preserving exhibits at the African American Museum in Atlantic City; involvement in research and service projects that impact the homeless, youth and seniors in the surrounding communities; and programs assisting those in need who are abroad. Students will also gain opportunities to intern for various nonprofit and for-profit organizations and government agencies.

High School Dual Credit

The Africana Studies Program offers Topics in African-American History and Culture-GAH 1360 as a dual credit course. The Dual Credit Program at Stockton University provides a community service to college-bound high school students, giving them a jump-start on college by providing the opportunity to earn college credits and complete high school course requirements simultaneously. For additional information, click here.