External Funding Opportunities

 

 

External Blocks

The below highlighted external opportunities are just a small snippet of funding available for projects in a variety of disciplines.  If the below funding does not suit your project's needs, we encourage you to utilize the Pivot Grant Research Search Tool to set up customized searches and track opportunities!

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Publishing Historical Records in Collaborative Digital Editions
National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

Deadline:          4.1.22 (Optional Draft), 6.8.22
                           8.1.22 (Optional Draft), 10.6.22

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission seeks proposals to publish online editions of historical records. All types of historical records are eligible, including documents, photographs, born-digital records, and analog audio. Projects may focus on broad historical movements in U.S. history, including any aspect of African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Native American history, such as law (including the social and cultural history of the law), politics, social reform, business, military, the arts, and other aspects of the national experience.

Projects that center the voices and document the history of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color are especially welcome.

With the 250th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence approaching, the Commission also invites projects that promote discovery and access to collections that explore the ideals behind our nation’s founding and the continuous debate over those ideals to the present day.

The goal of this program is to provide access to, and editorial context for, the historical documents and records that tell the American story. Applicants should demonstrate familiarity with the best practices recommended by the Association for Documentary Editing (ADE) or the Modern Language Association (MLA) Committee on Scholarly Editions . Because of the focus on historical documentary sources, grants do not support preparation of critical editions of published works unless such works are just a small portion of the larger project.

~ Additional Information ~


USArtists International
Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation (MAAF)

Deadline:          4.6.21 (For projects 7.1.22 to 6.30.23)

USArtists International is designed to encourage the presence of U.S. performing artists on international stages and in the global arts community; to support engagements that develop and expand both the careers and artistic goals of U.S. performers by providing connections with presenters, curators, and fellow artists; and to promote justice in the arts community by elevating the diverse voices contributing to the vibrant array of creative expression in the United States.

COVID-19
Mid Atlantic Arts seeks to serve artists and arts organizations with flexibility as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact countries globally.

Travel Track

Mid Atlantic Arts will accept applications to the USArtists International program that seek travel funding to perform internationally at eligible engagements. Application budgets should include only eligible, travel-specific expenses.* See Grant Amounts and Eligible Expenses below for further details. Panel scoring will continue to only include the reviewable criteria detailed below; application scoring will not incorporate the likelihood of a performance due to circumstances beyond the applicant’s control. Applicants should communicate with Mid Atlantic Arts staff about any changes to an engagement after an application is submitted. Due to the involvement of federal funds, any news about festival postponement, cancellation, or live performances becoming virtual should be discussed with staff.

Virtual Track
Artists and ensembles whose eligible international festival engagements have decided to offer the festival virtually can apply for funding. Application budgets should include only eligible, virtual-specific expenses.* See Grant Amounts and Eligible Expenses below for further details. Grantees that are awarded funds for travel and are later unable to travel may shift to the virtual track with staff approval. Revisions to the submitted budget will be required in this case. Please contact staff if you have

any questions about virtual track eligibility.

~ Additional Information ~


American Art
Henry Luce Foundation

Deadline:          Rolling

Each year the Foundation will support a number of substantial, carefully crafted projects that propose in-depth and multi-layered approaches to the study and exhibition of discrete areas of permanent collections. Applicants are encouraged to consider working with exceptional or challenging collection areas that have been under-utilized. 

The American Art Program seeks to support curatorial training and opportunities in the form of term positions linked to Responsive grant projects. Apprentice-level positions should involve continuous mentorship by more senior curators associated with the proposed work. Each year the Program will also fund several projects located entirely in museum or collection archives.

Although independent conservation projects are funded only rarely, conservation components can be included in proposals for collections-based projects.

~ Additional Information ~

 

Asia Program
Henry Luce Foundation

Deadline:          Rolling

In keeping with the mission of the Luce Foundation, the goals of the Asia Program are to encourage the development of expertise, capacity and resources on East and Southeast Asia, and to foster scholarly and cultural exchange between the United States and Asia. Grants awarded to institutions, support three areas: Asia-focused teaching and research in higher education; policy projects relevant to U.S.-Asia relations; and public education about Asia.

Goals are pursued through two categories of grantmaking: Responsive Grants and Special Initiatives.

Responsive Grants:
The Responsive Grants category is deliberately broad, allowing the Asia Program to respond to new ideas and keep abreast of trends, needs and priorities relevant to Asia-focused work in our three grantmaking areas (academic work, foreign policy, public education). Most awards are made to colleges, universities, think tanks, museums and other non-profit organizations based in the United States.

~ Additional Information ~

Implementation Grants
Davis Educational Foundation
The Davis Foundations

Deadline:           3.15.22, 5.14.22

The foundation’s objectives in making grants are to assist institutions in supporting more effective teaching and learning and/or controlling costs. The foundation operates two grant programs. Implementation Grants represent the original grantmaking program and are available for any of the foundation's objectives - teaching and learning and/or cost and affordability. The Presidential Grant Program was more recently introduced as an entry point for addressing cost and affordability objectives.

Examples of funded projects include:

  • Projects that improve the curriculum, the learning environment, assessment of undergraduate learning outcomes, faculty development, incentive systems, and administrative structures. Preference is given to projects aimed at strengthening the general education core of the undergraduate experience.
  • Individual as well as collaborative efforts among colleges and universities to reduce costs and improve learning.
  • Studies and planning efforts central to the foundation’s concerns and interests.

~ Additional Information ~


 

Education
Carnegie Corporation of New York

Deadline:           Continuous LOI

The goal of the Education program is: "American public education prepares all students with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions they need to be active participants in a robust democracy and to be successful in the global economy." Under this program, Carnegie has the following Focus Areas.

1. Leadership and Teaching to Advance Learning: For improving systems of preparing, recruiting, and developing teachers and education leaders to serve the needs of diverse learners; promoting alignment in human capital policies and practices across the system; enhancing professional learning for teachers and leaders, including through technology; and developing and implementing high-quality instructional materials, resources, and tools for teachers and leaders

2. New Designs to Advance Learning: For developing whole school models that provide more effective learning environments for diverse learners; stimulating the development of tools, technologies, and resources that enable school transformation; expanding capacity and removing policy constraints to enable new models; and building knowledge related to the design of the student experience

3. Public Understanding: For supporting research on strategies that can drive parent and family engagement in education; tools and resources to help parents understand and support the learning progress of their children; increasing productive dialogue among parents, students, and educators, and other stakeholders; and moving public discourse forward regarding important shifts in the educational landscape

4. Pathways to Postsecondary Success: For improving alignment in student learning expectations between K-12 and postsecondary education; improving postsecondary education, including through co-requisite and other innovative models; and strengthening postsecondary STEM learning, particularly in mathematics

5. Integration, Learning, and Innovation: For advancing integrated approaches across the Corporation's portfolios and the field that enable greater collaboration, coherence, and dynamism; improving learning, including continuous improvement and knowledge generation, management, and dissemination; and stimulating innovative ideas and models that inform our work across the Education Program and increase our impact

~ Additional Information ~


Research on the Future, Sustainability of the Internet
Internet Society Foundation

Deadline:           Rolling

The Internet Society Foundation has announced a new grants program in support of researchers worldwide who are studying the future and sustainability of the Internet. Through the program, grants of up to $200,000 over two years are available for research focused in one of two categories:

Greening the Internet — The Internet both affects and is affected by the environment and climate change. Having a critical awareness of this impact is key to the Internet’s resilience and ensures its sustainability for generations to come.

This awareness may include an assessment of energy consumption by the Internet, or the toxins and waste generated by its use. It may consider the enabling effect the Internet has on other sectors to limit greenhouse gas emissions. It may examine the ways in which climate change and extreme weather threatens Internet infrastructure and limits connectivity. Research focused on Greening the Internet should promote an awareness of these and other issues concerning the Internet’s environmental footprint and the sustainability measures needed for it and the planet to thrive.

The Internet Economy — New and emerging Internet-based activities have the power to disrupt the economic landscapes and lead to unpredictable economic futures. Having a firm grasp of the interactions that create the Internet Economy has the potential to reshape this uncertainty. Unpacking how the Internet transforms traditional ideas about competition, production, and consumption of goods and services could be useful in allowing for equitable and gainful participation of everyone in a rapidly digitizing global economy. Research proposals focusing on the Internet Economy should present an analysis of past or present ecosystems that yields insight into the future of the Internet and its dependent market(s).

The program is open to independent researchers and research institutions worldwide. To be eligible, researchers should have a postgraduate research degree (PhD, Masters) and publications/patents in the relevant area, Research institutions should be tax exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (or equivalent) and should have a mission that is aligned with that of the foundation.

Statements of Interest will be accepted beginning September 1. Full proposals will be accepted by invitation on a rolling basis thereafter.

~ Additional Information ~

Rapid Response Grants
Society of Environmental Journalists Fund

Deadline:           Rolling

The Society of Environmental Journalists Fund for Environmental Journalism invests in public service reporting on the environment and the journalists who produce it.

To that end, SEJ invites proposals for story grants on climate, conservation, and/or environmental health in North America. Rapid Response grants of up to $2,500 for individuals or $5,000 for team or outlet project will be awarded in support of the development and dissemination of significant new, original, and timely journalism projects focused on climate, conservation, and/or environmental health in North America that otherwise could not be completed.

Eligible applicants include journalists, professors, or students who are not employed or contracted to do any public relations work on environmental issues. Those whose paid work involves lobbying, media relations, or public relations on environment-related issues are not eligible.

See the Society of Environmental Journalists website for complete program guidelines and application instructions.

~ Additional Information ~

 

Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier: Core Research
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline:        3.2.22

The overarching vision of this program is to support multi-disciplinary research to sustain economic competitiveness, to promote worker well-being, lifelong and pervasive learning, and quality of life, and to illuminate the emerging social and economic context and drivers of innovations that are shaping the future of jobs and work.

For the purposes of this solicitation, work is defined as mental or physical activity to achieve tangible benefit such as income, profit, or community welfare. A proposal for a research grant in this program must focus on advancing fundamental understanding of future work and work outcomes for workers and society.

The specific objectives of the Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier program are to (1) facilitate multi-disciplinary or convergent research that employs the joint perspectives, methods, and knowledge of behavioral science, computer science, economics, engineering, learning sciences, research on adult learning and workforce training, and the social sciences; (2) develop deeper understandings of how human needs can be met and values respected in regard to how new technologies, conditions, and work experiences are changing; (3) support deeper understanding of the societal infrastructure that accompanies and leads to new work technologies and new approaches to work and jobs, and that prepares people for the future world of work; (4) encourage the development of a research community dedicated to designing intelligent technologies and work organization and modes inspired by their positive impact on individual workers, the work at hand, the way people learn and adapt to technological change, creative and inclusive workplaces (including remote locations, homes, classrooms, or virtual spaces), and benefits for social, economic, educational, and environmental systems at different scales; (5) promote deeper basic understanding of the interdependent human-technology partnership to advance societal needs by advancing design of intelligent technologies that operate in harmony with human workers, including consideration of how adults learn the new skills needed to interact with these technologies in the workplace, and by enabling broad and diverse workforce participation, including improving accessibility for those challenged by physical or cognitive impairment; and (6) understand, anticipate, and explore ways of mitigating potential risks including inequity arising from future work at the human-technology frontier.

Proposals to this program should describe multi-disciplinary or convergent research that addresses technological, human, and societal dimensions of future work. Technological innovations should be integrated with advances in behavioral science, computer science, economic science, engineering, learning sciences, research on adult learning and workforce training, and the social sciences. Proposals that address the impact of large-scale disruptions such as the Covid-19 pandemic on the future of jobs and work are also of interest.

~ Additional Information ~


Community Change Grants
The Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation

Deadline:        3.2.22 Preliminary Proposal; 8.3.22 Preliminary Porposal

The Foundation is interested in funding requests that support communities in establishing accessible, holistic, integrated, collaborative services benefitting children, adolescents, and young adults affected by intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, mental illness, and/or substance use disorders.

Community Change grants often support multi-year efforts and generally feature collaborative work intended to effect community-wide and/or systems-level change (e.g., efforts to eliminate structural barriers preventing the Foundation’s populations of interest from accessing services). Requests to create or expand programs operated or managed by a single agency are more appropriate for the Foundation’s Programs & Services grant portfolio.

~ Additional Information ~


Perception, Action and Cognition
Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS)
Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE)
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline:        6.15.22; 8.2.22

The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas focused on typical human behavior. The aim is to enhance the fundamental understanding of perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, reasoning, written and spoken language, and motor control. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic computation, connectionism, ecological, genetics, nonlinear dynamics, and complex systems, and a variety of methodologies including both experimental studies and modeling. The PAC program is open to co-review of proposals submitted to other programs both within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate and across other directorates. Proposals may involve clinical populations, animals, brain imaging, or computational modeling, or factors such as emotion and sleep, only if the work has direct impact on our understanding of basic processes underlying human perception, action, or cognition.

~ Additional Information ~


Cultural Anthropology Program Senior Research Awards
Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE)
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline:        8.15.22

The primary objective of the Cultural Anthropology Program is to support fundamental, systematic anthropological research and training to increase understanding of the causes, consequences, and complexities of human social and cultural variability. The Cultural Anthropology Program welcomes proposals from researchers in all sub-fields of cultural anthropology and research at any temporal and spatial scale. Methodologies and approaches employed may include ethnographic field research, surveys, remote sensing, the collection of bio-markers, experimental research inside or outside of laboratory settings, archival research, the analysis of materials collections and extant data bases, mathematical and computational modeling, and other research tools as appropriate for the research proposed. The overarching research goals should be to produce empirically grounded findings that will be generalizable beyond particular case studies and contribute to building a more robust anthropological science of human society and culture.

~ Additional Information ~


International Peace and Security
Carnegie Corporation

Deadline:        Rolling, contact for more information

Focus Areas:
Nuclear Security
Carnegie Corporation of New York has made significant contributions to reducing the threat posed by nuclear weapons since the early 1980s. Our grantmaking seeks to avert the spread or use of nuclear weapons.

Global Dynamics
Carnegie Corporation of New York is one of the major private philanthropic supporters of nongovernmental work on the dynamics among major global powers. Our grantmaking addresses the sources of global instability stemming from geopolitical trends with emphasis on the Euro-Atlantic and Asian regions, rapid technological advances, and other related trends.

Transnational Movements and the Arab Region
Carnegie Corporation of New York has over 20 years of engagement with academic and scholarly communities in the United States and the Middle East. Our grantmaking expands the activity, connections, and impact of the knowledge sector addressing critical trends shaping the future of the region and beyond.

Peacebuilding in Africa
The Corporation has been engaged with issues of peacebuilding in Africa for over a decade, most recently through a special Peacebuilding in Africa subprogram, a joint initiative of the International Peace and Security and the Higher Education and Research in Africa programs. Our grantmaking advances the field of peacebuilding and its policy application on the continent.

Cross-Cutting Challenges
The Corporation has long looked to think tanks and university-based research centers to provide authoritative, fact-based knowledge and analysis. Our grantmaking expands and deepens the connections between the policymaking and academic communities on critical peace and security issues.

~ Additional Information ~

Economic Institutions, Behavior, and Performance
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Deadline:       Interested researchers with a relevant project idea should email a letter of inquiry. 

Projects in this sub-program study households and individuals, specifically the role of “choice architecture” on their economic decision-making. Research topics include: risk-taking and insurance markets; time inconsistencies and the annuity paradox; cognitive biases; behavioral applications to policy; experimental testing of nudges or other regulatory interventions; behavioral welfare economics; obfuscated markets; consumer finance; probabilities and perceptions of extreme events; behavioral foundations and heterogeneous agents in macroeconomics; etc.

Interested researchers with a relevant project idea should email a letter of inquiry of no more than two pages. When submitting a letter of inquiry to the program, please indicate which sub-program best fits your research project.
Before submitting a letter of inquiry, please review the Foundation's guidelines on what we do not fund.

Grants made in this program are typically:
• Empirical and hypothesis-driven;
• Policy-relevant, but neither “policy research” nor advocacy;
• Motivated by nonideological questions rather than preconceived answers;
• Engaged with fundamental puzzles, but using fresh approaches;
• Unbiased, statistically significant, and replicable;
• Careful about baselines, controls, confounding variables, and econometrics;
• Savvy about markets, institutions, regulation, transaction costs, behavioral biases, etc.;
• Contributors to research infrastructure, datasets, or resources for general use;
• Generators of highly cited and catalytic results in high-quality journals;
• Ultimately concerned with the quality of life in the United States.

~ Additional Information ~

 

Clare Boothe Luce Program for Women in STEM
Henry Luce Foundation

Deadline:        3.1.22, 8.1.22

Since its first grants in 1989 the Clare Boothe Luce (CBL) Program for Women in STEM has become the single most significant source of private support for women in science, mathematics and engineering in Higher Education in the United States. Clare Boothe Luce, the widow of Henry R. Luce, was a playwright, journalist, U.S. Ambassador to Italy, and the first woman elected to Congress from Connecticut. In her bequest establishing this program, she sought “to encourage women to enter, study, graduate, and teach” in science, mathematics and engineering. To date, the program has supported more than 2,900 women. As of 2021, the CBL Program for Women in STEM has awarded a total of 819 grants to 200 different institutions, including 65 grants to Minority-Serving Institutions.

The CBL Program awards grants in three categories:

  • Undergraduate Awards
  • Graduate Fellowships
  • Professorships

~ Additional information ~


Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline:        3.7.22

The National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) acknowledges the need to expand and chronicle educational change efforts across the nation. To this end, DUE invites proposals to study the impact of the Vision and Change (V&C) movement in Undergraduate Biology Education. Specifically, this program seeks to support projects that evaluate a combination of factors such as the awareness, acceptance, adoption, and adaptation of V&C principles and outcomes including changes in curriculum, laboratories, and student retention, completion, and learning. Collectively, results of these projects are anticipated to describe the nature and extent of V&C’s use within the undergraduate biology curriculum. The projects could also describe key factors and approaches taken by the V&C community that have the potential to be useful for improving undergraduate education in other scientific disciplines or in interdisciplinary STEM education.

~ Additional information ~


Office of Naval Research (ONR) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Program
Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Department of the Navy (U.S. Navy)
United States Department of Defense (DOD)

Deadline:        3.30.22

The National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) acknowledges the need to expand and chronicle educational change efforts across the nation. To this end, DUE invites proposals to study the impact of the Vision and Change (V&C) movement in Undergraduate Biology Education. Specifically, this program seeks to support projects that evaluate a combination of factors such as the awareness, acceptance, adoption, and adaptation of V&C principles and outcomes including changes in curriculum, laboratories, and student retention, completion, and learning. Collectively, results of these projects are anticipated to describe the nature and extent of V&C’s use within the undergraduate biology curriculum. The projects could also describe key factors and approaches taken by the V&C community that have the potential to be useful for improving undergraduate education in other scientific disciplines or in interdisciplinary STEM education.

~ Additional information ~

Chemical Oceanography Program
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Directoratefor Geosciences (GEO)
National Science Foundation (NSF)

Deadline:        8.16.22

The program supports research into the chemistry of the oceans and the role of the oceans in global geochemical cycles. Areas of interest include chemical composition, speciation, and transformation; chemical exchanges between the oceans and other components of the Earth system; internal cycling in oceans, seas, and estuaries; and the use of measured chemical distributions as indicators of physical, biological, and geological processes.

~ Additional information ~

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