Reasonable Accommodation Process in Employment

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Information on this page focuses on disability and employment and pertains to current Stockton employees and applicants for employment at Stockton University.

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended (42 U.S.C. 126 §12102 et seq.), the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (N.J.A.C. 4A:7-3.1 & 3.2), and Stockton University’s Policy Prohibiting Discrimination in the Workplace prohibit discrimination because of disability. 

A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a history or record of such an impairment, or is perceived by others as having such an impairment. 42 U.S.C. 126 §12102(1)

Any applicant with a disability may request an accommodation to facilitate full participation in the application and interview process.

A qualified individual with a disability is one who can perform the essential functions of the job position sought or held, with or without reasonable accommodation. 

Any current employee with a disability may request reasonable accommodations to perform one or more essential functions of the job position held.  Documentation of disability is usually provided by the employee’s medical provider and presented to the Office of Human Resources by the medical provider or the employee. The interactive process begins when the employee with a disability requests a reasonable accommodation to perform one or more essential functions of the job held.

The Office of Human Resources works with the ADA-504 Coordinator who manages and oversees the ADA accommodation request and interactive process, providing reasonable accommodation decisions to the employee’s manager and the Office of Human Resources.

How to Request a Reasonable Accommodation

An applicant for employment may request a reasonable accommodation at any time, orally or in writing. All requests for accommodation can be directed to Stockton's Recruitment Manager by calling 609-652-4384.

A current employee may request a reasonable accommodation at any time, orally or in writing, to the Office of Human Resources who will then forward the medical documentation to the ADA-504 Coordinator.

The Reasonable Accommodation Request Form must be completed by the employee.  The employee requesting accommodation must also provide permission for the ADA-504 Coordinator to contact the employee’s medical provider, if needed, to assist in determining a reasonable accommodation.  The medical provider completes the Medical Provider Authorization Release Form.

A request for an accommodation also can be made by an employee representative (e.g. family member). If the request comes through a third party, the request should be confirmed with the employee.

Frequently asked Questions

Major life activities include, but may not be limited to, walking, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, seeing, hearing, caring for oneself, and performing manual tasks.  Major life activities also include major bodily functions. 42 U.S.C. 126 §12102(2)

The interactive process is a collaborative effort between the employee and ADA-504 Coordinator to discuss the need for a reasonable accommodation as well as identify effective accommodation solutions.

A reasonable accommodation is specific to the employee’s documented disability and the essential functions of the employee’s current job description. A reasonable accommodation is determined on a case-by-case basis and secured through the interactive process.

The ADA provides examples of reasonable accommodations that include, but may not be limited to, making existing facilities readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities, to job restructuring, modified work schedules, reassignment to a vacant position, acquisition or modification of equipment or devices, provision of qualified readers or interpreters. 42 U.S.C. 126 §12111(9)

A work modification is a temporary modification requested by an employee. The work modification can be to employee’s work schedule, shift, environment, for example, afforded to an employee by the employee’s manager. The employee’s request may be due to a documented school closure, a documented medical issue that does not meet the definition of disability, or for other reasons. 

A reasonable accommodation is specific to the employee’s documented disability and the essential functions of the employee’s current job description. A reasonable accommodation is determined on a case-by-case basis and secured through the interactive process. 

Sometimes an applicant or an employee may ask for an accommodation that is not reasonable or necessary, that poses an undue hardship requiring significant difficulty or expense on the institution. In order to determine whether an accommodation would impose an undue hardship, the institution will consider the nature and cost of the accommodation and other consideration factors prescribed under the ADA.

The elimination of one or more essential functions of an employee’s job description is not a reasonable accommodation.

University Procedure 6153 describes five types of leave time: vacation, administrative leave, compensatory leave, donated leave, jury duty. An employee who takes any of the five leave types described in the Procedure 6153 would not be working. Reasonable accommodations are provided to assist a qualified employee with a disability in performing the essential functions of the job held.

Additionally, an employee may take family leave under the New Jersey Family Medical Leave Act (N.J.S.A. 34:11B-1, et seq.) to care for a child or other family member.

Related University Policies

  • I-67 Disability, Accessibility, and Reasonable Accommodation
  • I-125 Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals

Related University Procedures

  • 3990 Service Animal Procedure, Student and Community Procedure
  • 6950 Internal Procedure for Disability, Accessibility, and Accommodation

Institutional and governmental guidelines on COVID-19 and its variants

Stockton University will continue following guidelines and protocols from institutional and governmental sources, including (but not limited to):